Top 5 Emergency Tools To Keep In Your Car For Winter

The winter months are almost here.Therefore, as we take a look at our vehicle emergency kits, there some the basic principles that should help you decide what to store in your vehicle. Afterward, we will discuss the top five tools that you should keep in your car for the winter months.

The winter months are almost here. The snow is already beginning to fall in some parts of our nation. It is a good idea to keep an emergency kit in your vehicle. Those who live in New England and the Upper Midwest already know the value of keeping some essential survival items and tools in their cars. Snow and ice can keep your afternoon drive home from work from being smooth. However, for those who live in mild climates, sub-zero temperatures in the winter can be a safety hazard, even on a clear day. Therefore, as we take a look at our vehicle emergency kits, there some the basic principles that should help you decide what to store in your vehicle. Afterward, we will discuss the top five tools that you should keep in your car for the winter months.

Principles For Choosing Emergency Tools

Principle # 1: Experience

The first principle for choosing what tools to store in your vehicle is your experience with the devices themselves. There are many articles, websites, and YouTube® videos that will give advice on emergency tools for your car. However, the question that should be asked is how much experience do you have with those tools? If you have no experience with vehicle maintenance then keeping a mechanic’s toolbox in your care is overkill. Thus, your experience should govern the types and quantities of tools that you keep in your car.

Principle # 2: Historic Winter Climate In Your Location

The second principle that should influence what you keep in your car is the kind of winters that you experience in your location. For example, there are places in the southwest that get snow, but blizzards are rare. By contrast, in the upper Midwest, blizzards and below-zero temperatures are an annual event. Thus, a person living in the southwest may not need to carry a pair of snowshoes in their car as a might a person living in Montana. Therefore, with these principles in mind, what are the top 5 emergency tools that one should keep in their vehicle during the winter?

Emergency Tools To Keep In Your Car

1. Tire Chains

The first emergency tool that should be held in your car at all times is a good set of tire chains. Tire chains are not technically a “tool.” However, they will make your chances of getting home in winter weather more possible. It is important to remember that tire chains wear out over time. The links can become broken, or the fastening clasps can become broken. Therefore, remember to keep your tire chains maintained and usable at all times.

2. Highway Flares

Road flares have become more sophisticated over the years. There are many types of road flares sold in the local auto parts store. Some people choose to purchase the electronic flares that use flashing LED lights. These types of flares are great for the urban commute home in a major city. However, out on the freeway to visit relatives for Christmas, is not the place for electronic flares. The kinds of road-flares to store in your car for the winter are those the stick kind that light on fire and burn a reddish, orange flame. These are a multi-use item. Not only are they useful for signaling for help, but they are also great for starting fires in an emergency.

A Word of Caution

Road Flares can be a valuable asset in the winter. However, there is always a risk of a burn injury with their use. Be careful when using them and comply with all safety instructions related to their storage, ignition, employment, and disposal.

3. Pioneer Tool Kit

A Pioneer Tool Kit is a kit that consists of three tools: a shovel, ax, and pick mattock. Truckers and off-road enthusiasts keep these tools stored on their vehicles. Their primary use is to dig out a stuck car. However, in an emergency situation in the winter, they can be used to build a shelter or process firewood. The name of this tool set comes from the frontier days when these types of items were carried on covered wagons.
The full-sized shovel, ax, and mattock are suitable for the large SUVs, RVs, and the mid-sized pickup trucks. However, there are smaller versions of these tools that are available at your local hardware store that fit comfortably in smaller vehicles. For example, you may have to substitute a full-sized ax for a camp hatchet. Additionally, you may want to store these tools in a bag. The regular military duffle bag will hold the standard size tools. A smaller heavy duty bag made of nylon or Cordura will keep the smaller version of the pioneer tools. The trunk or storage space in your vehicle will determine the size of your tools and storage bag.

Pioneer Tool Kit Items:

4. Towing Strap

A towing strap made of heavy-duty nylon is an invaluable tool to keep your vehicle. The towing strap is also a multi-use item in an emergency. The standard use of the towing strap is to help another car pull a car out of a rut or ditch. However, the towing strap can be used in the construction of improvised snow shows or mukluks. The towing strap should be considered part of your cordage considerations as you think about your emergency kit for your car.

5. Jumper Cables

It is amazing how many people do not have a set of jumper cables in their vehicles. This item used to be a standard item to carry in your car. However, because of the sophistication of the newer cars, the use of jumper cables can be problematic. For example, in some vehicles, the battery is not in the engine compartment but in some other location on the car. Yet, despite these concerns, a quality set of jumper cables are an invaluable asset to store in your car in the winter. Jumper cables can be used for emergency cordage and other emergency tasks.

A Word of Caution

There is always a hazard for an electrical shock when jumper cables are attached to the batter or charging point on your vehicle. Be careful to use them in compliance with all safety instructions relating to the use of jumper cables.

Conclusion

These essential items are critical to your successful survival if stranded off the road in winter. Winter is as dangerous climate as Summer. The level of snow and ice coupled with below-zero temperatures and wind are the perfect conditions for a winter survival emergency away from home. Therefore, keep your vehicle adequately set up to meet emergency situations in the winter. An excellent vehicle survival kit and emergency tools are lifesavers in a stranded situation. Thus, choose your emergency kit items and tools wisely in preparation for the winter.

Upgrade Your Emergency Bag For Winter

The Importance of An Emergency Bag

It is time to get your Get-Home-Bag (GHB) adjusted for the fall and winter months. Your bag is the one emergency item that you keep up-to-date. It should be stored in the trunk of your car or the utility box on your truck. If you find yourself stranded on the side of the road, your GHB will be critical to your survival. Therefore, keep its contents current and adjusted for the season.

Recommended Items

Below is a table of suggested contents to consider as items for your bag. This is not a comprehensive list. Moreover, it should be understood that every item listed will not fit into a bag that is coinvent to store in your vehicle. So choose any gear for your bag wisely.

Here is a sample packing list for a winterized Get-Home Bag:

1. Backpack

5.11Tactical® Rush 72 Backpack (55 liters)

2. Fire

Sigma 3 Fire Kit

3. Water

The Sigma 3 Water Kit

4. Shelter

5. Food and Food Procurement

6. Clothing (Single Change of Clothes)

7. Cold Weather Gear

8. Wet Weather Gear

9. Cutting Tools:

10. Illumination Items

11. Navigation Items

12. Communication and Signaling Items

13. First-Aid Items

 

Handy Information For Backpacking

June 23, 2018

Here are some handy pieces of information to add to your backpacking packing list: Smart Cards. I created three smart cards based on information that I gleaned online and from other sources. I hope that you find these helpful. 

This is my Hot Weather Card

My Summer Smart Card

This is my Cold Weather Card

My Cold WX Card

This is my Map Reading Helps Card

My Map Card